Methods and Methodology of Cleaning Historic Masonry Structures - 1 LU/HSW

Tuesday, August 13, 2019, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. EST

This session presents the rationale and methodology for cleaning both interior and exterior historic masonry surfaces. Cleaning can be the first type of repair measure performed on a new masonry structure to remove any construction residue. Cleaning can also be performed as part of a maintenance program or restoration project. In each of these instances, the masonry can be susceptible to damage caused by an improper selection of materials or methods. Understanding how to approach and develop a proper testing program is the first step in determining which technique will clean the building while promoting long-term performance. The program will introduce current cleaning systems and describe their general performance and applications. Specific attention will be paid to chemical, micro-abrasive, laser and latex systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to list common types of soiling and deterioration phenomenon on exterior and interior masonry surfaces.

  • Participants will be able to identify types of appropriate cleaning methods and repairs for various types of masonry, using examples. Specific attention will be paid to safe use of chemical, micro-abrasive, laser and latex systems.

  • Participants will be able to define appropriate methodology for approaching cleaning programs on contemporary and historic masonry buildings, using examples.

  • Participants will gain insight into specific intervention methods and materials, using examples.

About the Speaker

Roy J. Ingraffia, Jr., Assoc. AIA, MS, CSI, PA AIC

National Director for Partnerships and Strategic Initiatives, IMI

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Roy is an Associate of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC).

He is an Architectural Conservator with experience in design and contracting capacities and his professional work has primarily focused on the preservation of historic masonry structures through research of traditional materials/methods and development of contemporary restoration techniques. In addition to his work with IMI, Roy teaches the Masonry Conservation Seminar within the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania.